Men’s Health Network

Men's Health Network (MHN) is a national non-profit organization whose mission is to reach men, boys, and their families where they live, work, play, and pray with health awareness and disease prevention messages and tools, screening programs, educational materials, advocacy opportunities, and patient navigation.

 

The Latest

  • Celebrating 25 Years of Men's Health

    See how you can help and donate to the campaign

  • My Prostate Cancer Coach

    Because every man is different and every cancer is unique, it is important to find out the risk group for your individual cancer.

  • Know Your Cancer

    Are you or a loved one newly diagnosed with prostate cancer? Empower yourself with the information you need to make the right treatment decision. 

  • Fibromyalgia Caregiver Toolkit

    Being a caregiver isn’t always easy. Each day can throw new challenges your way. With that in mind we’ve designed this toolkit to provide insight, tips and tools for the male caregivers of patients with fibromyalgia.

  • National Men’s Health Week

    Men’s Health Week is celebrated each year as the week leading up to and including Father’s Day. This week heightens awareness of preventable health problems and encourages early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys

  • A new survey that we developed in partnership with Chattem, Inc., the U.S. consumer healthcare division of Sanofi, shows that 90% of men in the U.S. want to take charge of their own health. The survey results also indicate the significance of sexual health to men today, with nearly 1 in 3 men (30%) saying sexual health is one of the most important elements of their overall health and wellness. This survey was conducted online by Harris Poll and its results were shared in recognition of International Men's Day, which takes place on Saturday, November 19, 2016.

  • An ongoing series of top-level discussions on the health and wellbeing of boys and men across the lifespan. The Dialogue on Men’s Health provides structure and coordination for efforts to find common ground and synergy among healthcare professionals, patient groups, community organizations, private corporations, and government agencies as they address the unique challenges that confront men, boys, and their families.

    Read the Framework for Advancing the Overall Health and Wellness of America’s Boys and Men here.

    Read A Vision for Wellness and Health Equity for American Indian and Alaska Native Boys and Men here.

  • Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn's efforts in improving men's health have been recognized and honored with the “Outstanding Political Leadership in Men’s Health Award" by the American Public Health Association: Men's Health Caucus.

  • Despite Years of Progress, Male Life Expectancy Declines for the 3rd Year, Increase of Suicide and Drug Overdose to Blame

     

    WASHINGTON – The Congressional Men’s Health Caucus in partnership with Men’s Health Network joined a coalition of representatives from leading health, advocacy, and government organizations to hold a briefing on Capitol Hill June 19 to discuss health outcomes for men and women.

     

    The briefing comes just one week until the end of Men’s Health Month, an annual awareness period solely dedicated to education and activities on the health and wellness of men and boys, and following the 25th year of National Men’s Health Week (June 10-16), a special awareness period recognized by Congress.

     

    Speakers at the briefing—including representatives from PCORI (Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Center), the National Black Men’s Health Network, HealthyWomen, the Office of Population Affairs, and the National Center for Health Statistics—outlined health outcomes for men and women over the last 25 years. The average life expectancy of males and females in the U.S. has increased substantially over the last century. However, life expectancy declined between 2014-2015 for both males and females and has continued to decline for males since then.

     

    “Often times we may find ourselves guilty of letting our health go. It becomes something that is put to the back of our minds. However, I am a firm believer in the progress and the promise of a better tomorrow.  We have some of the best and brightest minds working to find cures for even the most complex ailments,” said Congressman Donald Payne Jr. (D-NJ) co-chair of the Congressional Men’s Health Caucus. “Our screening processes today are quicker and less evasive than ever before, able to catch disease early. Equally important is what we do. Our personal health starts with us. Healthy living is not simply a one-time commitment; it is the formation of habits that require a conscious effort one day at a time.”

     

    “The health of families—men, women, and children—is the backbone to any community, which is why these discussions that include legislators, policymakers, and advocates are so crucial to the health and wellness of our nation,” said Ana Fadich Tomsic, Vice President of Men’s Health Network. “I’m glad that as we close out Men’s Health Month and the 25th year of Men’s Health Week, that the topic of health for men and boys remains relevant and continues to push toward stronger outcomes.”

     

    “Being healthy is not something that happens overnight, it’s something that we have to work at every single day,” said Congressman Markwayne Mullin (R-OK), co-chair of the Congressional Men’s Health Caucus. “Whether it is making the bed, eating right, or getting in a full workout every morning, we have to make sure each and every day that we are doing what we can to take care of ourselves. The little successes we experience every day add up to living a healthy, disciplined life. As we approach the end of Men’s Health Month, I would like to thank Men’s Health Network for helping to raise awareness on the importance of health and wellness.”

     

    While heart disease and cancer continue to be the main causes of death for men and women in the U.S., young men, in particular, have seen an increase in deaths due to suicide and drug-overdose, according to data from the National Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Some 66.4 percent of drug overdoses in 2016 were due to opioids; men are more likely to die of an overdose than women.

     

    During the meeting, speakers said that the increase in deaths included unintentional injuries— a broader category that includes unintentional drug poisoning and overdose deaths.

     

    “Life expectancy at birth has been decreasing since 2014 [among males],” said Renee Gindi, a statistician at the National Center for Health Statistics. “We’ve seen significant increases in homicide, suicide, and unintentional injuries …We’re seeing death from all causes increase [in younger age groups]. We’ve seen substantial decreases in the life expectancy of men.”

     

    Representatives for the nonprofit HealthyWomen said even though mortality rates have stabilized for women after a decline in 2015, the health and wellness of women remains fundamental to the health of families.

     

    “Women are the CEOs of their family. As such, we make health care decisions for our family. We also need to be informed,” said Heidi Rosvold-Brenholtz, Senior Vice President for Strategic Engagement & Health Policy at HealthyWomen. “It’s not women’s health, it’s not men’s health, it’s the health of a unit. Two healthy houses make a whole.”

     

    To see a report card on the health of men and women in each state, go to:

    www.StateOfMensHealth.com

     

    Men's Health Network (MHN) is an international non-profit organization whose mission is to reach men, boys, and their families where they live, work, play, and pray with health awareness messages and tools, screening programs, educational materials, advocacy opportunities, and patient navigation. Learn more about MHN at www.menshealthnetwork.org and follow them on Twitter @MensHlthNetwork and Facebook at www.facebook.com/menshealthnetwork. For more information on MHN's ongoing Dialogue on Men's Health series, visit www.dialogueonmenshealth.com

     

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  • Passed by Congress and signed by President Clinton in 1994, Awareness Week Charges into Its 25th Year

     

    WASHINGTON – National Men’s Health Week (NMHW) is celebrating 25 years of health awareness and advocacy during Men’s Health Month this June. NMHW is celebrated each year as the week that ends on Father’s Day, June 10-16 this year. The week is celebrated around the globe as International Men’s Health Week.

     

    The legislation creating NMHW was sponsored by Senator Bob Dole and Congressman Bill Richardson and was signed into law by President Bill Clinton on May 31, 1994. Since then, the week has grown to include Men’s Health Month and is recognized by communities and jurisdictions throughout the country. Over 350 Governors, Mayors and Native American communities have issued proclamations in their jurisdictions. Those can be viewed here.

     

    “I know that we all have busy lives. But, too often men, forego routine health screenings. And they are dying from treatable diseases—like colon cancer and heart disease—because of it,” said Congressman Donald M. Payne, Jr., (D-NJ) co-chair of the Congressional Men’s Health Caucus. “I know firsthand how hard it is to change behaviors and make healthier choices, whether that be improving our diet, exercising—or going to the doctor. But I also know that changing behavior will help men live longer. For the past 25 years, National Men’s Health Week has shined a light on men’s health. As co-chair of the Congressional Men’s Health Caucus, I am proud to work with the Men’s Health Network to not only raise awareness of men’s health issues during this week, but more importantly to change behaviors that lead to the overall improvement in men’s health.”

     

    “25 years may seem like a long time—and ground has certainly been gained in making men more aware of their health and wellness—but there is still a lot more than needs to be done to improve the health, wellness, and outcomes for men,” said Ana Fadich-Tomsic, VP of Men’s Health Network (MHN). “As an organization, Men’s Health Network is beyond ecstatic to see National Men’s Health Week turn 25 and that its core purpose of awareness, prevention, and education is now more relevant than ever.”

     

    During this time, health care professionals, private corporations, faith-based community organizations, and government agencies, plan activities that focus on the health and well-being of boys, men, and their families. These activities take the form of Wear Blue campaigns, informational articles in corporate newsletters, lunch-n-learns, conferences, bulletin board displays, videos, community health fairs, and more. Many take advantage of the posters and logos available for download on the Men’s Health Month web site. A national focus is Wear Blue Friday, celebrated yearly as the Friday before Father’s Day which is June 16 this year. Members of Congress commemorated NMHW’s 25th year during a Congressional Workout event that also encourages our nation’s leaders to be engaged in their health.

     

    “We take things for granted, guys have this perspective about themselves that they’re still strong and they’re still as young as they use to me,” said Congressman Markwayne Mullin (R- OK), co-chair of the Congressional Men’s Health Caucus. “You’ve got to continue moving yourself and pushing yourself forward. If we want to be healthier than our parents, we’ve got to set that bar high.”

     

    A key part of the continued momentum is the annual event and social media campaign, including:

     

    • SaludTues & Men’s Health Network Twitter Chat: “Men’s Health Month” and other partners 1:00 p.m. EDT on June 18

     

    • The “Men & the Opioid Crisis” Twitter Chat with Men’s Health Network and partners is scheduled for June 26 at 2 PM EST

     

    • #ShowUsYourBlue campaign: People all over the world take pictures of themselves and others wearing blue to increase awareness for men’s health and posting the photos on social media with the #ShowUsYourBlue hashtag

     

    • June 14 is Wear Blue Friday, the #ShowUsYourBlue social media storm where individuals are encouraged to take selfies of themselves wearing blue during the day and post to social media using the hashtag

     

    Free resources are available in both English and Spanish at www.MensHealthMonth.com

     

    Men’s Health Month and Men’s Health Week are sponsored by Men’s Health Network (MHN), which maintains a list of experts and spokespersons on all areas of male health and wellness, including fatherhood issues. Men’s Health Month supporters include Sanofi-Regeneron, Allergan Foundation, and Pfizer Inc.

     

    Men's Health Network (MHN) is an international non-profit organization whose mission is to reach men, boys, and their families where they live, work, play, and pray with health awareness messages and tools, screening programs, educational materials, advocacy opportunities, and patient navigation. Learn more about MHN at www.menshealthnetwork.org and follow them on Twitter @MensHlthNetwork and Facebook at www.facebook.com/menshealthnetwork . For more information on MHN's ongoing Dialogue on Men's Health series, visit www.dialogueonmenshealth.com

     

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  • Awareness Period Puts Focus on Health of Men and Boys including the 25th Year of National Men’s Health Week

     

    WASHINGTON – This June, families and communities around the nation are bringing men’s health to the forefront with the kick-off of the 2019 Men’s Health Month,

    an annual awareness period solely dedicated to education and activities on the health and wellness of men and boys. This year also marks the 25th year of National Men’s Health Week (NMHW), a special awareness period recognized by Congress. Men’s Health Month is built on the pillars of AWARENESS – PREVENTION – EDUCATION – FAMILY.

     

    This year, Men’s Health Week will be celebrated June 10-16, ending on Father’s Day. The week is celebrated as International Men’s Health Week around the globe. During this time, health care professionals, private corporations, faith-based community organizations, and government agencies, plan activities that focus on the health and well-being of boys, men, and their families.

     

    “Men continue to lag behind women in health outcomes while leading the top causes of death in the U.S., which is why an awareness period like Men’s Health Month is critical for men, boys, and communities to be more engaged in their health,” said Ana Fadich-Tomsic, VP of Men’s Health Network (MHN). “Consequently, more health dangers loom for men who continue to suffer from the lack of access to mental health services and the impact of the ongoing opioid crisis. Now, more than ever, support is needed from policymakers, state and federal legislators, the media, and our private and non-profit partners to help fight these systemic issues and save lives.”

     

    Over 350 mayors and governors across the country have recognized June as Men's Health Month with official proclamations. These proclamations are displayed in Congress.  Report cards on the status of the health and well-being of boys and men in each state are available at the State of Men’s Health web site.  Free resources and toolkits are available in both English and Spanish at www.MensHealthMonth.com .

     

    “Although we continue to make progress in raising awareness about the importance of overall preventative health screenings, in addition to self-care, mental health, and the ongoing opioid epidemic, many men and women are still neglecting their own health care needs,” said Beth Battaglino, RN, CEO, HealthyWomen.  “We share in the goal of Men’s Health Month to raise awareness, educate, provide resources and remove any stigmas that are associated with these important health topics that affect so many men and young boys.”

    Men still face challenges in health outcomes that extend beyond their physical wellness. This year, men and boys continue to suffer a “silent crisis” in accessing mental health services. Men are more likely to commit suicide and suffer from depression. Additionally, the ongoing opioid crisis has also hit men hard as they are more than twice as likely to die from opioid use than women, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation.

    “Men are significantly impacted by the opioid crisis. In 2017, 68 percent of Americans who died from opioid overdoses were men (CDC),” said Holly Jespersen, Senior Communications Manager of Shatterproof.  “Shatterproof is committed to Men’s Health Month and continues to work towards ending the unjust stigma of addiction and ensuring treatment based on science is available to all who need it."

    "The Partnership for Safe Medicines is proud to support awareness around Men's Health Month. Too many men in America have been victimized by the counterfeit pill crisis that has currently spread to 48 states and killed people in over 30 states," said PSM Executive Director Shabbir Imber Safdar. "We are hopeful that our efforts will result in more men learning about the dangers of counterfeits and fake online pharmacies and engaging in safer behavior.”

     

     

    A key part of the continued momentum is the annual event and social media campaign, including:

     

    • SaludTues & Men’s Health Network Twitter Chat: “Men’s Health Month” and other partners 1:00 p.m. EDT on June 18

     

    • The “Men & the Opioid Crisis” Twitter Chat with Men’s Health Network and partners is scheduled for June 26 at 2 PM EST

     

    • Congress joins the celebration with a Congressional Workout, planned for June 5.

     

    • #ShowUsYourBlue campaign: People all over the world take pictures of themselves and others wearing blue to increase awareness for men’s health and posting the photos on social media with the #ShowUsYourBlue hashtag

     

    • June 14 is Wear Blue Friday, the #ShowUsYourBlue social media storm where individuals are encouraged to take selfies of themselves wearing blue during the day and post to social media using the hashtag

     

    Men’s Health Month and Men’s Health Week are sponsored by Men’s Health Network (MHN), which maintains a list of experts and spokespersons on all areas of male health and wellness, including fatherhood issues. Men’s Health Month supporters include Sanofi-Regeneron, Genomic Health, and Pfizer, Inc.

     

    Men's Health Network (MHN) is an international non-profit organization whose mission is to reach men, boys, and their families where they live, work, play, and pray with health awareness messages and tools, screening programs, educational materials, advocacy opportunities, and patient navigation. Learn more about MHN at www.menshealthnetwork.org and follow them on Twitter @MensHlthNetwork and Facebook at www.facebook.com/menshealthnetwork. For more information on MHN's ongoing Dialogue on Men's Health series, visit www.dialogueonmenshealth.com

     

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