Men’s Health Network

Men's Health Network (MHN) is a national non-profit organization whose mission is to reach men, boys, and their families where they live, work, play, and pray with health awareness and disease prevention messages and tools, screening programs, educational materials, advocacy opportunities, and patient navigation.

 

The Latest

  • Celebrating 25 Years of Men's Health

    See how you can help and donate to the campaign

  • My Prostate Cancer Coach

    Because every man is different and every cancer is unique, it is important to find out the risk group for your individual cancer.

  • Know Your Cancer

    Are you or a loved one newly diagnosed with prostate cancer? Empower yourself with the information you need to make the right treatment decision. 

  • Fibromyalgia Caregiver Toolkit

    Being a caregiver isn’t always easy. Each day can throw new challenges your way. With that in mind we’ve designed this toolkit to provide insight, tips and tools for the male caregivers of patients with fibromyalgia.

  • National Men’s Health Week

    Men’s Health Week is celebrated each year as the week leading up to and including Father’s Day. This week heightens awareness of preventable health problems and encourages early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys

  • A new survey that we developed in partnership with Chattem, Inc., the U.S. consumer healthcare division of Sanofi, shows that 90% of men in the U.S. want to take charge of their own health. The survey results also indicate the significance of sexual health to men today, with nearly 1 in 3 men (30%) saying sexual health is one of the most important elements of their overall health and wellness. This survey was conducted online by Harris Poll and its results were shared in recognition of International Men's Day, which takes place on Saturday, November 19, 2016.

  • An ongoing series of top-level discussions on the health and wellbeing of boys and men across the lifespan. The Dialogue on Men’s Health provides structure and coordination for efforts to find common ground and synergy among healthcare professionals, patient groups, community organizations, private corporations, and government agencies as they address the unique challenges that confront men, boys, and their families.

    Read the Framework for Advancing the Overall Health and Wellness of America’s Boys and Men here.

    Read A Vision for Wellness and Health Equity for American Indian and Alaska Native Boys and Men here.

  • Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn's efforts in improving men's health have been recognized and honored with the “Outstanding Political Leadership in Men’s Health Award" by the American Public Health Association: Men's Health Caucus.

  • Advocacy Groups Declare New Recommendations Can Save Lives

     

    WASHINGTON — Just a week after the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) issued new recommendations urging men aged 55-69 to consult their health providers on when, or if, they need to be screened for prostate cancer, advocacy groups led by the Men's Health Network in collaboration with the Congressional Men's Health Caucus, Prostate Cancer Task Force, and representatives from USPSTF converged on Capitol Hill Thursday outlining how the new recommendations will likely save lives and produce healthier outcomes in men.

     

    “Prostate cancer is a unique cancer. It can be a slow growing cancer—many men who have prostate cancer won’t know unless they get checked,” said Alex Krist, MD, MPH, Vice-Chairperson of the Task Force. “[Screenings] will save a few lives from prostate cancer.”

     

    The Task Force is a government supported panel composed of national medical experts whose recommendations influence healthcare providers and both public and private insurance coverage decisions. Preventive screenings rated “A” or “B” by the Task Force are covered by the Affordable Care Act. The latest recommendation are a “C” rating for men aged 55-69 and a “D” rating for men age 70 and above. The rating for men aged 55-69 is an improvement from the “D” rating the Task Force issued in 2012 for prostate cancer using the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening test.

     

    “We believe that the new recommendation will encourage men to take a more active role in their health and wellness,” said Ana Fadich, Vice President of Men’s Health Network. “We are hopeful that the Task Force will be more inclusive of men age 70 and older in future recommendations.”

     

    The latest recommendations come more than a year after the Task Force announced its plans to reconsider its rating for PSA screenings. Krist said the USPSTF used that time gather more than 600 comments, feedback, and input from medical experts and advocacy groups.

     

    Still, the latest recommendations leave little guidance for high-risk groups such African American men, veterans, and men with a family history of prostate cancer. Those groups made a significantly smaller size of the sample group the recommendations were based off and in some cases, weren’t included at all.

     

    During the briefing, medical experts and advocacy groups from the Veterans Health Council, American Urological Association, and Zero, the End of Prostate Cancer urged the Task Force to solicit more research for high-risk groups.

     

    “It is clear that the science is important in the work that we’re doing,” said Darrell Sabbs a health advocate and legislative affairs and community benefits manager for Phoebe Putney Health Systems. “Prostate cancer can kill but it doesn’t have to kill. A lot of the data we need has not been found.”

     

    “The ruling, like all rulings, can be very difficult,” said Tom Berger of the Veterans Health Council. “Men exposed to Agent Orange during [the Vietnam War] are at a higher risk” of prostate cancer.

    Other experts applauded the USPSTF for past and current recommendations regarding prostate screenings because it created general guidelines for PSA tests and made providers more aware of overdiagnosis and treatment for the disease.

     

    “The recommendations made us abandon our ‘caveman’ approach,” said Nilay Gandhi, MD, a urologist at Potomac Urology. “It really opened our eyes to overdiagnosis [of prostate cancer]. All of this made us smarter. It’s made us better at detecting more aggressive forms of cancer.”

     

    “Providers, too, need to be educated. Individual health institutions can play a role in adopting current guidelines,” said Raegan Durant, MD, MPH an associate professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “Screening is only the beginning.”

     

     

    With Men’s Health Month (June) fast approaching, now is a good time for men to discuss prostate cancer and other health screenings with their healthcare providers.  MHN’s screening recommendations for men and for women can be found at www.GetItChecked.com

    # # #

    About Men’s Health Network

    Men's Health Network (MHN) is an international non-profit organization whose mission is to reach men, boys, and their families where they live, work, play, and pray with health awareness messages and tools, screening programs, educational materials, advocacy opportunities, and patient navigation. Learn more about MHN at www.menshealthnetwork.org and follow them on Twitter @MensHlthNetwork and Facebook at www.facebook.com/menshealthnetwork. For more information on MHN's ongoing Dialogue on Men's Health series, visit www.dialogueonmenshealth.com  

  • Health Experts Still Advocate for Improved Rating for Older Men

    WASHINGTON — Men’s Health Network (MHN) commends the latest recommendation from the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) that urges men to talk to their healthcare providers about when, or if, they need to be screened for prostate cancer using the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening test. While the improved recommendation will have a positive impact for men under 70, MHN continues to advocate for men of all age groups to speak to their healthcare provider about prostate cancer screenings. The USPSTF final recommendations are a “C” rating for men aged 55-69 and a “D” rating for men age 70 and above.

     

    “We believe that the new recommendation will encourage men to take a more active role in their health and wellness,” said Ana Fadich, Vice President of MHN and Chair of the American Public Health Associations Men’s Health Caucus. “We are hopeful that the Task Force will be more inclusive of men age 70 and older in future recommendations. MHN believes there is a tremendous benefit for all men, regardless of age, in communicating with their healthcare providers about screenings.”

     

    The Task Force is a government supported panel composed of national medical experts whose recommendations influence healthcare providers and both public and private insurance coverage decisions. Preventive screenings rated “A” or “B” by the Task Force are covered by the Affordable Care Act.

     

    The "C" recommendation means that "the USPSTF recommends selectively offering or providing this service to individual patients based on professional judgment and patient preferences." The group’s latest draft recommendation is an improvement over the 2012 “D” rating that recommended against the use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing for the early detection of prostate cancer.

     

    MHN applauds the "C" rating for prostate cancer screening of men aged 55—69 but is concerned about the "D" rating for men aged 70 and above. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, on average, a 70-year-old man can expect to live another 14.5 years. And, a "D" rating endangers Medicare coverage for those aging men in good health who have many years of productive life ahead of them. The Affordable Care Act gives the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services the authority to deny payment for any service that has a "D" rating from the USPSTF.

     

    Fadich said that MHN applauds the Task Force for being inclusive of the medical and advocacy community for the latest recommendations. MHN believes that the Task Force’s latest findings will encourage more men to talk to their healthcare providers about prostate cancer screening.  MHN suggests that all men see their healthcare provider for a baseline PSA test at age 40.

     

    “Like anything in healthcare, the more communications, the better. If men are starting a conversation with their physicians, they may realize they are at greater risk for prostate cancer than they thought,” said Vivek Sinha, MD, an MHN advisor specializing in Family Medicine. “If more people are communicating and talking about preventative screenings, we may be able to save lives.”

     

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men with approximately 165,000 new cases each year and over 29,000 deaths, according to the American Cancer Society. African-American men, men with a family history of the disease, and men exposed to Agent Orange and some other chemicals are at greater risk.

     

    Still, medical experts believe there are benefits to screening men outside of those groups and over the age of 70. Addressing men age 70 and above, Giorgianni, PharmD, Senior Science Advisor to MHN stated, “The approach to screening men in later years should be more closely aligned with current life expectancy and adjusted every two to three years to reflect male life expectancy “

     

    With Men’s Health Month (June) fast approaching, now is a good time for men to discuss prostate cancer and other health screenings with their healthcare providers.  MHN’s screening recommendations for men and for women can be found at www.GetItChecked.com

     

    About Men’s Health Network

    Men's Health Network (MHN) is an international non-profit organization whose mission is to reach men, boys, and their families where they live, work, play, and pray with health awareness messages and tools, screening programs, educational materials, advocacy opportunities, and patient navigation. Learn more about MHN at www.menshealthnetwork.org and follow them on Twitter @MensHlthNetwork and Facebook at www.facebook.com/menshealthnetwork. For more information on MHN's ongoing Dialogue on Men's Health series, visit www.dialogueonmenshealth.com  

     

    # # #

     

     

  • Men’s Health Network Forms Coalition of Organizations Calling for Greater Awareness of Quality of Life Issues Facing Testicular Cancer Patients, Survivors, and Loved Ones

     

    WASHINGTON — Men’s Health Network (MHN) has joined with other cancer organizations to form an awareness coalition to recognize Testicular Cancer Awareness Month. During April, these organizations are calling for increased research and greater awareness of the challenges facing testicular cancer patients, survivors, and their loved ones.

     

    Testicular cancer is the most common cancer among men between 15 and 35 years old but has one of the highest survival rates, if found early. That’s what makes prevention techniques and overall awareness critically important. This year alone, in the U.S., more than 9,000 men will be diagnosed with the disease, according to the American Cancer Society. An estimated 400 deaths occurred in the U.S. last year due to the disease.

     

    “It’s crucial for young men (15-35) to know that this is the leading cause of cancer for their age group and remains treatable if caught early,” said Ana Fadich, MPH, CHES, Vice President at MHN. “Even so, survivors still need support after a testicular cancer diagnosis, because it's a huge impact on daily life. That is why awareness is essential in reaching younger men who may not receive cancer prevention messages.”

     

    The Testicular Cancer Coalition, which includes Men’s Health Network, the Men’s Health Initiative, the Testicular Cancer Society, ChapCare and the Testicular Cancer Foundation, continues to rally around improving the quality of life for testicular patients and survivors, while bringing awareness to their issues and calling on stronger tools to assess their health and wellbeing.

     

    Survivors have increased risks of anxiety, depression, heart disease, short and long-term memory loss, among other health concerns, as a result of having testicular cancer. This is in addition to issues of impotence, incontinence, or loss of libido; current assessment tools are methodologically too weak to detect these problems.

     

    "The assumption is that life after treatment for males and their families affected by testicular cancer returns to normal,” said Michael Rovito, PhD, of the Men's Health Initiative (MHI) an affiliate partner of MHN. "Most times, it's quite the opposite scenario unfolding. These families have lifelong wellness concerns stemming directly from the treatment of testicular cancer that occurred years, even decades, prior. I'm proud that MHI is partnering with this group to lead the way to develop more impactful research and conduct more effective outreach among testicular cancer survivors to improve their quality of life." 

     

    In the U.S., men continue to be placed at unnecessary risk due to the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force’s (USPSTF) decision to recommend against testicular self-exams and against testicular cancer exams in a clinical setting.  Compounding this problem is the failure of the Affordable Care Act to provide regular preventive healthcare visits for men as are provided for women.

     

    “In my four decades of practice, I have found testicular exams and TSE—especially when paired with the oversight of a trusted primary care provider—to be quite valuable,” said Gregory Pecchia, MD, an advisor to Men’s Health Network. “These exams yielded probable lifesaving early detection.”

     

    The TesticularCancerAwarenessMonth.com website helps educate people about risk factors, warning signs, and treatment options for the disease. The site offers videos, a social media toolkit, downloadable brochures, research articles, and examples of awareness activities to turn a difficult-to-discuss problem into an interactive and easier-to-approach learning experience.

     

    During the month, Men’s Health Network and its coalition partners will be telling the stories of testicular cancer patients and survivors, offering interviews from patients and health experts. Men’s Health Network will also hold a Twitter chat the week of April 23 to further promote testicular cancer awareness to a wider audience.

     

    About Men’s Health Network

     

    Men's Health Network (MHN) is an international non-profit organization whose mission is to reach men, boys, and their families where they live, work, play, and pray with health awareness messages and tools, screening programs, educational materials, advocacy opportunities, and patient navigation. Learn more about MHN at www.menshealthnetwork.org and follow them on Twitter @MensHlthNetwork and Facebook at www.facebook.com/menshealthnetwork. For more information on MHN's ongoing Dialogue on Men's Health series, visit www.dialogueonmenshealth.com  

     

     

    ###

 

Events Tabs

Participate

Embedded image permalink
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sensitive Issues for Men community on HealthUnlocked